Wednesday, February 10, 2016

UKIPT5 Dublin Day 1A: Level 9-12 updates (1,000-2,000, 300 ante)

2016_UKIPTDub_MickeyMay_86509.jpg


* CLICK TO REFRESH FOR LATEST UPDATES
* Day 1A is over. Day 1B starts at 10am Thursday. You can read all about Day 1A here.
* 52 of 214 players made it through
* You can catch up with Level 1-8 coverage here

9:20pm: Done for the day
Level 12: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

Roughly 54 players survived Day 1A. They'll be back at noon on Friday for Day 2. We'll be back tomorrow at 10am for Day 1B. Before then though a wrap of the today's action will be forthcoming.

9:07pm: Last four hands
Level 12: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

The tournament clock has been paused and they'll be four more hands before play is done for the day. --NW

9:05pm: Heads-up in the €5,000 side event
Level 12: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

Just two players remain in the stacked €5,000 event and it's Mike McDonald versus Joao Vieira for the title. The winner will take €36,730, whilst the runner-up gets €21,830. Ivan Luca finished third, the Argentinian winning €14,550 for his efforts. -- NW

8:55pm: Felted
Level 12: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

Down to just 72 players now with Dirk Gerritse, Alan Teffaud, Zoltan Gal, Emil Patel, Michael Naughton, Rodrigo Kipper, Barry Donovan, Derwin Hayes, Keith Maguire and Fintan Hand the latest to exit. --NW


Want to start your own UKIPT campaign? Sign up for PokerStars and start your journey. Click here to get an account.

8:45pm: Chipped up
Level 12: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

It's likely the end of day chip leader won't be decided until the final minutes of play but the following are all throwing their hat in the ring for that honour:

Dan Carter, 210,000
Vladimir Velikov, 190,000
Peter Eichhardt, 175,000
Ranno Sootla, 170,000
Matt Davenport, 160,000

UKIPT5_Dublin_day1a_dan_carter.jpg

Get Carter!


8:35pm: Last level of the night
Level 12: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

Almost there! We're into the final level of the night. The average stack is a shade over 66,000--NW

8:30pm: It's a long way from Playa del Carmen
Level 11: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

What do you get when you pitch together an Englishman, Irishman and Mexico? The answer is Kevin Killeen, Scott Margereson and an apartment in Playa del Carmen.

The two used to be flatmates in Mexico, both are in the main event today and chugging along nicely. Killeen's been moved tables and is now sat two to the left of another fine Irish player, Dermot Blain to be precise, and he has around 75,000.

Margereson, who won two WCOOP events in 2015, is fairing even better as he's up to 85,000. -- NW

8:20pm: Connolly more than quadruples up
Level 11: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

Declan Connolly got amazing value from his hand after he three-bet all in for 7,600 as he was called by the original raiser and three other opponents, before getting there.
The flop fanned [4d][8d][4s] and one of the callers - the big-stacked Vladimir Velikov - led out for 10,800 from the big blind. Jose Lopez Tapia was in no mood to mess around and moved all in for over 100,000. Velikov, who had a massive 212,00 behind and could afford to call, tanked before he folded.

Tapia: [kh][ks] for an over pair.
Connolly: [ad][kd] for a flush draw.

The board ran out [2d][qc] to make the Irishman's flush. -- MC

8pm: Busted
Level 11: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

The field of 214 has been reduced to just 81 with two levels left to play. Among those who've felt the icy breath of the hangman's noose on their poker tournament life are: Liam Hooks, Gary Coulahan, Georgios Karakousis, Stephen Woodhead, Jacqueline Cachia, Tommy O'Rourke, Ross Loggie, Georgios Zisimopoulos, Jack Sambrook, Seamus Cahill, Ivan Deyra and Ian Marmion. --NW

UKIPT5_Dublin_day1a_jack_sambrook.jpg

Jack Sambrook - one of the fallen

7.45pm: Oh no Mo. Charania busts
Level 11: Blinds 800-1,600, 200 ante

Table 6's talent pool has been diluted somewhat with the elimination of Mohsin Charania. The American pro got unlucky with kings a short while ago, and it was big-slick that finished him off.

Peter Eichhardt played executioner and he filled the blog in on the 150k-pot. A player raised with pocket jacks before Charania three-bet with ace-king. Eichhardt's cold four-bet with queens was enough to force out the original raiser but not Charania who jammed. Eichhardt called and saw an ace appear as the first community card, followed by a lovely looking queen. -- MC


Want to start your own UKIPT campaign? Sign up for PokerStars and start your journey. Click here to get an account.

7:35pm: Big stacks
Level 10: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

A circuit of the room has unearthed the following big stacks:

Ranno Sootla, 195,000
David Pollock, 176,000
Vahid Karimkhanezand, 163,000
Joao Simao, 158,000
Vladimir Velikov, 153,000
Frederic Bertrand, 130,000

UKIPT5_Dublin_day1a_vahid_karimkhanezand.jpg

Vahid Karimkhanezand


7:25pm: Big pairs on table 6
Table 6 continues to offer up big hands and action, even if a lot of the faces are new. Former EPT Grand Final champion Mohsin Charania has joined the table, but lost with a big pair, just before another newbie - Fintan Hand - won win a big pair.

Charania and Erik Olofsson had made it to the river of a board that read [kh][qc][tc][4s][5s]. The former checked from the blinds and called after the latter bet 18,000 from early position. Olofsson opened [ad][js] for a flopped straight bettering Charania's [kc][ks] for top set.

The very next hand saw Hand raise to 3,000 from the hijack and Peter Eichhardt defended his big blind. Both checked the [3d][ad][3s] flop before Eichhardt check-called 2,300 on the [qd] turn. The board completed with the [ac] and both players checked. Hand opened [qc][qh] and scooped with his full house.

UKIPT5_Dublin_Day1A_Fintan_Hand.jpg

Hand on the up but at a tricky table

Mohsin Charania, 57,000
Erik Olofsson, 78,000
Fintan Hand, 70,000
Peter Eichhardt, 56,000
Ranno Sootla - 195,000
Chris Dowling - 18,700
-- MC

7:05pm: Back we go
Level 10: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

Fed and watered the players are now back in their seats and action has restarted. --NW

5:45pm: Dinner break
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

The remaining players are now on a 75 minute dinner break. Play will re-start at roughly 7pm. --NW

5:40pm: Defending champion still in
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

There's been a few good UKIPT title defences in Dublin on the UKIPT and Kevin Killeen, who triumphed last time the tour was in town, is still going strong on Day 1A this time round. He's got about 28,000. After he won his UKIPT title he moved to Mexico but is back in Ireland at the moment.

"Living here at the moment, I'll stay here to after the Irish Open at least," he told us. "After that probably Vegas and then maybe back to Mexico. We'll see."

As reported below the other UKIPT Main Event winners in the field today - Nick Abou Risk and Josh Hart - are both out. However, we do still have an EPT champion in the field in the shape of Mohsin Charania. He's got around 71,000. -- NW


Want to start your own UKIPT journey? Sign up for PokerStars and start your journey. Click here to get an account.


4:55pm: Long dinner break for....
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

Those who failed to make the upcoming dinner break included: John Hanaphy, Anders Overland, Sean Prendiville, Rasmus Agersov, Counstrain-Jean Edmond, Bruno Lima, Eldon Orr, Vaino Nevanlinna, Cesar De Leon, Victor Pastor, Jussi Nevanlinna, Senh Ung, Gareth Jennings, Andy Black, Chris Simpson, Josh Hart, Laurence Ryan, Steven van Zadelhoff, Miguel Suarez, Ezequiel Lebed, Matis Ruzzi, Jason Wheeler (pictured)UKIPT5_Dublin_Jason_Wheeler.jpg, David Burke, Keith Brennan, Anthony Ainscough, Guillaume Nolet, Emmett Davis, Jochen Kaiser, Dan Borlan, Ryan McEathron, Alexandre Schifa, Ricardo Ibanez, Burak Kavas, Donal Kennedy, Alan White, Ronan Gilligan, Pierre Neuville, Sszoto Merceron, Frederic Bertrand and Mark Ballesty. -- MC

5:30pm: There's a new chippie in town as Abou Risks busts
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

Nick Abou Risk will not become a three-time UKIPT champion in his hometown after he busted in a big pot that made Ranno Sootla the (likely) new chip leader.

Sootla told the blog that Abou Risk raised from under the gun and he defended his big blind to head to a [k][j][5] flop that contained two hearts. A four landed on the turn and Sootla bet 18,000 (into what he thought was 23k) and called when Abou Risk shoved for 30,000.

UKIPT5_Dublin_Day1a_Ranno_Sootia.jpg

Sootla leading the way

Sootla opened king-jack and survived a blank river against Abou Risk's ace-king.

Ranno Sootla, 160,000
Nick Abou Risk, eliminated
-- MC

5:15pm: Cody can't stop the rot
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

At the very end of level eight we lost Team PokerStars Pro Jake Cody. Sadly for him is stack only went in one direction today. Still he's got the chance to bounce back tomorrow - literally - as he's going to be taking part in the Dodgeball Trampolining.

5pm: End of the road for Ruzzi
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

I arrived at the table to see the cards already on their backs, it was Matias Ruzzi who was all in, the Argentinian had [Ah][Js] whilst Amgd Nadr had [As][Qc].

The [6c][7h][6s][Kh][Qh] board eliminated Ruzzi and boosted Nadr to 70,000. --NW

Key UKIPT5 Dublin Facts:

- 25,000 starting stack
- Blinds starting at 50/100 for 250 big blinds
- Levels are 45 minutes on Day 1 and they'll be 12 of them. From Day 2 onwards levels increase to 60 minutes.
- Day 1A is today, Day 1B takes place tomorrow, the field will then combine for the first time on Friday. We'll reach the money during the 10 levels of play on Day 2 and then play down to a final table on Saturday. Sunday is a rest day, and then on Monday the final table will play out on the TV table on EPTLive with cards-up coverage and bring Season 5 of the UKIPT to a close. Cue mad celebrations and swigging of champagne from the trophy (possibly).
- Full UKIPT5 Dublin schedule here.
- There's a boat load of other events today including a €5,000 (!) Hold'em event and two live satellites to the Main Event tonight. Those satellites start at 16.00 GMT and 21.30 GMT.
- It's not all about the poker here in Dublin. There are plenty of #StarsFun activities including Dodgeball Trampolining. Yes, you read that right Dodgeball Trampolining.

PokerStars Blog Reporting Team at UKIPT5 Dublin: Marc Convey and Nick Wright. Photos by Mickey May. Follow the PokerStars Blog on Twitter: @PokerStarsBlog























































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Poker Strategy With Rep Porter: Playing Postflop As The Aggressor

In my last column, I asserted that having position and being the aggressor is the most profitable situation you can find yourself in as you move to the flop in limit hold’em. I suggested that when you are entering the pot, you should almost always be raising. You should be trying to limit the amount of players who enter the pot behind you.

Today, I want to look at why having position and tempo puts you in a more profitable situation. Having the tempo simply means you were the last aggressor on the previous street. I think the best way to start looking at a situation is to look at both ends of the spectrum. The alternative to having position and the tempo is to be out of position and to have called to close the action on the previous street. Let’s start by looking at heads-up play.

If you called a raise out of the big blind, you are out of position (unless it was the small blind that raised) and without the tempo. When you are in this spot, you almost always correctly check the flop. When you have made a hand, you want to ensure that your opponent puts at least one more bet in on the flop. It is also bad to bet your hits and check your misses. This makes it far too easy for your opponents to play against you.

Getting a c-bet from the preflop aggressor is pretty standard in limit hold’em. So usually you will find yourself facing a bet on the flop. If you have missed, you usually will have to give up. You may be able to call once or twice with a draw or a weak pair hoping to improve, but you will lose this pot far more often than you win. You only flop a pair or an eight-card draw with suited connectors about half the time. Not all of those hands win the pot. Suppose you had 8Spade Suit 7Spade Suit. You defend against an early position raiser. The flop comes A-8-3 rainbow. You have a pair. But against the early position range, you are in a lot of trouble. You can only beat hands like K-Q, K-J, and 7-7. Some people don’t even play those hands in early position. You can probably call the flop bet and look to improve on the turn, but you are likely to have to fold to another bet.

From the other side of the fence, the situation is much more promising. You just raised in middle position and only the big blind called. You feel like you’re winning already. Regardless of the flop, you are going to get to make a profitable c-bet. The pot is 4.5 little bets. You get to bet, and your opponent has to fold when they have missed. If they call with all their pairs and draws, including some gutshots and overcard hands, they are still folding more than a third of the time. This means you need 2-1 to make a break-even c-bet and you are getting 4.5-1. So right away, being the preflop aggressor has put you in a position to make a profitable bet.

Often if your opponent just calls on the flop, they will check the turn. They may do this to check-raise, or they may be willing to check-call down, or maybe they are going to fold. Their motivation isn’t as important as the end result, that result being that you get to decide if more money is going into the pot on the turn. You can bet if you have a strong hand and you can bet if you think your opponent will fold at a decent rate. You will be getting just over 3-1 from the pot at this point. You can check if you have a hand you want to draw to or just get to showdown cheaply with.

You can probably see that being the player in position and with tempo is a much better place to be. This is true when you three-bet the original opener as well. The dynamic plays out in a similar fashion. If you just call, now the original opener gets to make the profitable c-bet on the flop. Just getting to be the c-bettor should be enough of a reason to want to be the aggressor, but the fact that raising also increases your chance of having position should make it an easy choice. Each street, the player with the tempo from the previous street is at an advantage. This advantage is amplified when that player also has position. So, in limit hold’em, my best advice is: when you find a hand you want to play, be aggressive, very aggressive. ♠

Rep Porter is a two-time WSOP bracelet winner and is the lead instructor at ThePokerAcademy.com, whose mission is to help poker players achieve better results through better decisions and that is done by teaching poker in a way that makes learning easy and enjoyable with high quality courses taught by professional players.

Sign up for The Poker Academy today to take your game to the next level.



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UKIPT5 Dublin Day 1A: Level 9-10 updates (600-1,200, 200 ante)
^

2016_UKIPTDub_MickeyMay_86509.jpg


* CLICK TO REFRESH FOR LATEST UPDATES
* Day 1A consists of twelve 45 minute levels - currently playing level 10
* 104 of 214 players remain
* Late registration is closed
* You can catch up with Level 1-8 coverage here

7:05pm: Back we go
Level 10: Blinds 600-1,200, 200 ante

Fed and watered the players are now back in their seats and action has restarted. --NW

5:45pm: Dinner break
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

The remaining players are now on a 75 minute dinner break. Play will re-start at roughly 7pm. --NW

5:40pm: Defending champion still in
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

There's been a few good UKIPT title defences in Dublin on the UKIPT and Kevin Killeen, who triumphed last time the tour was in town, is still going strong on Day 1A this time round. He's got about 28,000. After he won his UKIPT title he moved to Mexico but is back in Ireland at the moment.

"Living here at the moment, I'll stay here to after the Irish Open at least," he told us. "After that probably Vegas and then maybe back to Mexico. We'll see."

As reported below the other UKIPT Main Event winners in the field today - Nick Abou Risk and Josh Hart - are both out. However, we do still have an EPT champion in the field in the shape of Mohsin Charania. He's got around 71,000. -- NW
4:55pm: Long dinner break for....
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

Those who failed to make the upcoming dinner break included: John Hanaphy, Anders Overland, Sean Prendiville, Rasmus Agersov, Counstrain-Jean Edmond, Bruno Lima, Eldon Orr, Vaino Nevanlinna, Cesar De Leon, Victor Pastor, Jussi Nevanlinna, Senh Ung, Gareth Jennings, Andy Black, Chris Simpson, Josh Hart, Laurence Ryan, Steven van Zadelhoff, Miguel Suarez, Ezequiel Lebed, Matis Ruzzi, Jason Wheeler (pictured)UKIPT5_Dublin_Jason_Wheeler.jpg, David Burke, Keith Brennan, Anthony Ainscough, Guillaume Nolet, Emmett Davis, Jochen Kaiser, Dan Borlan, Ryan McEathron, Alexandre Schifa, Ricardo Ibanez, Burak Kavas, Donal Kennedy, Alan White, Ronan Gilligan, Pierre Neuville, Sszoto Merceron, Frederic Bertrand and Mark Ballesty. -- MC

5:30pm: There's a new chippie in town as Abou Risks busts
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

Nick Abou Risk will not become a three-time UKIPT champion in his hometown after he busted in a big pot that made Ranno Sootla the (likely) new chip leader.

Sootla told the blog that Abou Risk raised from under the gun and he defended his big blind to head to a [k][j][5] flop that contained two hearts. A four landed on the turn and Sootla bet 18,000 (into what he thought was 23k) and called when Abou Risk shoved for 30,000.

UKIPT5_Dublin_Day1a_Ranno_Sootia.jpg

Sootla leading the way

Sootla opened king-jack and survived a blank river against Abou Risk's ace-king.

Ranno Sootla, 160,000
Nick Abou Risk, eliminated
-- MC

5:15pm: Cody can't stop the rot
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

At the very end of level eight we lost Team PokerStars Pro Jake Cody. Sadly for him is stack only went in one direction today. Still he's got the chance to bounce back tomorrow - literally - as he's going to be taking part in the Dodgeball Trampolining.

5pm: End of the road for Ruzzi
Level 9: Blinds 500-1,000, 100 ante

I arrived at the table to see the cards already on their backs, it was Matias Ruzzi who was all in, the Argentinian had [Ah][Js] whilst Amgd Nadr had [As][Qc].

The [6c][7h][6s][Kh][Qh] board eliminated Ruzzi and boosted Nadr to 70,000. --NW

Key UKIPT5 Dublin Facts:

- 25,000 starting stack
- Blinds starting at 50/100 for 250 big blinds
- Levels are 45 minutes on Day 1 and they'll be 12 of them. From Day 2 onwards levels increase to 60 minutes.
- Day 1A is today, Day 1B takes place tomorrow, the field will then combine for the first time on Friday. We'll reach the money during the 10 levels of play on Day 2 and then play down to a final table on Saturday. Sunday is a rest day, and then on Monday the final table will play out on the TV table on EPTLive with cards-up coverage and bring Season 5 of the UKIPT to a close. Cue mad celebrations and swigging of champagne from the trophy (possibly).
- Full UKIPT5 Dublin schedule here.
- There's a boat load of other events today including a €5,000 (!) Hold'em event and two live satellites to the Main Event tonight. Those satellites start at 16.00 GMT and 21.30 GMT.
- It's not all about the poker here in Dublin. There are plenty of #StarsFun activities including Dodgeball Trampolining. Yes, you read that right Dodgeball Trampolining.

PokerStars Blog Reporting Team at UKIPT5 Dublin: Marc Convey and Nick Wright. Photos by Mickey May. Follow the PokerStars Blog on Twitter: @PokerStarsBlog

























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Win 2016 World Series of Poker Trip With The Poker Academy

ThePokerAcademy.com will be closing the 12-Week Challenge on May 1st and choosing the winners that week. That means if you’ve been waiting to get started, now is the time to do it!

The 12-Week Challenge was designed for students to become significantly better at poker, by reviewing one session of ThePokerAcademy.com’s 12-session course each week, submitting reviews at the end of the week as you progress.

On May 1st, The Poker Academy will choose one winner from every 25 entries and send those players to the WSOP to play in a $1,000 buy-in event, buy-in, flight, and hotel included!*

With 12 weeks left until the May 1st deadline, starting this week will keep you on track. Of course, you can progress at your own speed, so it’s not absolutely necessary to start this week, but if you want to follow the plan they laid out, it’s time to start now!

*Terms and conditions apply and can be found here.


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JOSEPH EVE CPAs names Lindan Elliott partner

JOSEPH EVE CPAs has named Lindan Elliott, CPA, CISA a partner in the firm. Elliott has been with JOSEPH EVE since 2011, acting as the senior manager of the firm’s Technology Group.

“We are thrilled to welcome Lindan as a partner in the firm. For the past four years, he has spearheaded initiatives for our Tribal and commercial clients that have helped them improve efficiencies, increase accuracy, streamline processes, and save money. His insights have been incredibly valuable to our clients, our team members, and to the firm in general, and we are very pleased to announce his promotion,” said Managing Partner Joseph Eve.

Elliott is a specialist in JOSEPH EVE’s cloud-based ERP solutions and process outsourcing services and is considered one of the industry’s leading specialists on could-based accounting technologies. Through his insightful efforts, the firm’s clients have implemented technologies that have improved business effectiveness and efficiencies. He also developed Asset Edge, a fixed-asset module for JOSEPH EVE clients who use the Intacct system.

In his new role, Elliott will focus on managing and growing the Intacct Practice as well as developing and marketing new technology solutions to further improving client operations.

Prior to joining JOSEPH EVE, Elliott served as technical program manager of Global Financial Systems at Amazon.com, and as senior associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers. He holds a Masters in Accounting and Information Systems from the University of Montana.

Elliott is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Washington State Society of CPAs, Information Systems Audit and Control Association, and the Institute of Internal Auditors.


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Hold’em with Holloway, Vol. 65: Todd “sharkslayerrr” Breyfogle on Bankroll Management

They say few things are as important to a poker player’s success than bankroll management. Those who manage their bankrolls well can ensure they stay in the game for years, if not a lifetime. Those who don’t, well, they come and go, eventually fading into poker obscurity.

I wanted to explore bankroll management more in depth here in Hold’em With Holloway, but I wanted to do so on a relatable level. For me, that meant catching up with some players you may have never heard of before, but are still out there grinding successfully day in and day out. These are not only players who have attained a certain level of success, but are still working their way up in the poker world.

One was such player was Andrew Moreno, the husband of former PokerNews hostess Kristy Arnett. I wanted to share his wisdom here, but to be honest his response proved so awesome that we decided to turn it into its very own strategy article, which you can read by clicking here.

Therefore I’m going to kick things off with a conversation with Todd “sharkslayerrr” Breyfogle, a former high-stakes online pro now turned live no-limit hold’em and pot-limit Omaha grinder. I first met Breyfogle on the Mid-States Poker Tour (MSPT), and was impressed with his play. Since then, I continually see him exhibit a strong work ethic and enviable discipline.

Breyfogle, who hails from Minnesota, has amassed $411,292 in live tournament earnings, which includes a career-best $55,653 for winning the 2011 Binion’s Poker Classic Main Event. Other highlights on his poker résumé include earning $46,420 for a fourth-place finish in the 2010 LA Poker Open Championship Event, picking up $43,546 for taking sixth in the 2015 Chicago Poker Classic Main Event, and cashing for $33,038 for winning the 2012 Great Minnesota Freeze Out.

I caught up with Breyfogle to ask him a few questions regarding bankroll management and how he continues to be a force in low-to-mid buy-in cash games and tournaments.

PokerNews: For those looking to play low-stakes games ($1/$3 & $2/$5 NLHE), what size bankroll do you suggest they have? And any other general bankroll considerations or recommendations for these players?

Breyfogle: It depends on what the maximum buy-in is. The deeper the buy “max” I recommend 20x that max buy amount to allow for variance.

In such games, how much do you recommend buying in for?

My opinion is you should always sit with the max. You want to be able to stack the big stack, who is hopefully the weakest player at the table. Also the metagame part when I see someone sitting short almost always tells me they are weak-passive, under bankrolled, and don’t understand implied odds/stack value.

Hold’em with Holloway, Vol. 65: Todd “sharkslayerrr” Breyfogle on Bankroll Management 101
Todd Breyfogle

For tournaments, do you recommend finding a backer, selling action, etc.? Why or why not?

Again it depends on your bankroll, or if you’re newer to the game [you might] try to play satellites to get your seat. It depends as well on the buy-in. For me personally, I never sell in anything $1,650 or less in MTTs. Anything above I usually sell 25-35% of myself with a markup of 1.2 or so.

The reason I don’t sell $1,650 and less is because I feel I have an edge in these fields and giving up equity for that buy-in is not worth it for me personally. Each player has to determine what they feel comfortable with, but I would say most good winning MTT players sell pieces of themselves just to cut the huge variance.

Speaking of tournaments, what buy-ins do you recommend a player with a limited bankroll focus on? At what point (i.e., buy-in level) would/should they start thinking about selling action?

I suggest playing cash games to win your buy-in for MTT tourneys or try super satellites or selling pieces of yourself. Be honest with yourself. Just because you final table a bunch of your local $100-$350 MTTs does not mean you’re ready for bigger buy-ins, and certainly don’t think final tables are a reason someone would back you. Also be prepared to have some skin in the game. Rarely will someone just fully buy you into a bigger MTT.

Do you keep diligent track of your results? Why or why not? If so, how do you go about it (software, apps, Excel, etc.)?

Yes, any good pro should be doing this or you’re lying to yourself and missing all kinds of data that you just can’t remember by playing. I have used “Poker Income Pro” for the last three years. It’s the best software to track live sessions that I have seen.

Any wisdom for how one can stick to a bankroll plan? What advice do you have for players?

I’d say 90% don’t have a bankroll plan and I’m talking about a lot of supposed full-time live pros. Depending on where you live and what’s available, game selection is super important rather than the limit. Too many players that have huge egos can’t step down when losing or don’t want to admit they’re just being outplayed at the table and should pick up a different game at that level.

* * * * *

Thanks to Todd for taking the time. You can follow Todd Breyfogle’s poker exploits on Twitter @sharkslayerrr.

Next week I’ll continue the bankroll management theme by talking to Daniel Arfin, who makes his living at the $5/$10 to $10/$20 no-limit hold’em tables. Be sure to check that out next Wednesday.

Want to stay atop all the latest in the poker world? If so, make sure to get PokerNews updates on your social media outlets. Follow us on Twitter and find us on both Facebook and Google+!

Hold’em with Holloway, Vol. 65: Todd “sharkslayerrr” Breyfogle on Bankroll Management 102

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2016 Card Player Player of the Year Race -- Christopher Leong Climbs To Eighth Place

February is off to a fast start for the Card Player Player of the Year race. The first week of the second month of 2016 saw several big tournaments wrap up, awarding huge payouts and chunks of POY points. Here is a look at the events that most impacted the standings over the past seven days:

2016 WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open

Chris LeongThis year’s running of the World Poker Tour Borgata Winter Poker Open $3,500 no-limit hold’em main event sported a $3 million guarantee. The promise of a massive payday to the eventual champ drew a sizable field of 1,171 entries, easily surpassing the guarantee to build a final prize pool of $3,748,371.

In the end Christopher Leong came out on top, earning $816,246 and 1,440 Player of the Year points for the win. This was his first tournament score of the year, but was big enough on it’s own to launch him into eighth place in the overall standings unaided.

Leong overcame a tough final table on his road to the title, outlasting the likes of Yevgeniy Timoshenko (5th – $206,160) and reigning World Series of Poker main event champion Joseph McKeehen (4th – $249,267).

This was McKeehen’s third final table finish of the year, having already finished runner-up in the $100,000 super high roller at the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure and second in a $5,300 six-max no-limit hold’em event also held at the PCA. The 720 points he earned with his latest deep run were enough to see him climb to 10th place in the overall standings.

Aria High Roller XXIV and XXV

Dan ShakFor the last few years Aria has played host to back-to-back $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em high roller events each and every month. The 2016 February runnings of these small-field, high-stakes tournaments took place over the past weekend.

The first of the two tournaments drew 53 total entries to build a prize pool of $1,272,000. In the end the final three players decided to make a deal, evenly splitting the remaining prize pool between them. Erik Seidel, Barry Hutter and Dan Shak all earned $296,800 for their performance in the event, with Shak locking up the title and the trophy by holding the most chips at the time the deal was struck.

Bryn Kenney finished sixth in the event for $76,320 and 140 POY points. This was already his third final table of the year. He made his fourth the following day when he finished fourth in the second of the $25,000 buy-in events, earning $82,080 and 210 POY points. He now sits in 16th place in the overall standings.

A total of 38 entries were made the second time around to bring the prize pool to $912,000. In the end Justin Bonomo came out on top, defeating Barry Hutter heads-up to secure the title and the top prize of $383,040.

2016 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure main event runner-up Anthony Gregg finished third for $127,680 and 280 points and currently occupies the sixth-place spot on the POY leaderboard as a result.

Here is a look at the current top 20 in the POY standings:

Rank Player POY Points Earnings
1 Ari Engel 2,614 $1,148,102
2 Steve O’Dwyer 2,178 $2,820,030
3 Tony Dunst 1,900 $700,000
4 Samantha Abernathy 1,840 $448,532
5 Michael Watson 1,824 $728,325
6 Anthony Gregg 1,800 $739,855
7 Nick Maimone 1,444 $1,007,060
8 Christopher Leong 1,440 $816,246
9 Connor Drinan 1,428 $1,907,147
10 Joseph Mckeehen 1,420 $1,531,847
11 Sean Winter 1,295 $966,180
12 Chance Kornuth 1,260 $746,172
13 Phillip McAllister 1,252 $362,060
14 David Peters 1,250 $3,392,805
15 Rafael Yaraliyev 1,200 $487,288
16 Bryn Kenney 1,154 $2,031,480
17 Alex Lynskey 1,140 $311,500
18 Ivan Luca 1,108 $664,350
19 Andy Philachack 1,080 $393,188
19 Salomon Ponte 1,080 $344,420

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